• Reposition assets for tax-efficient wealth transfer

    If you’re close to or in retirement and asking yourself how you can best pass your wealth on to your heirs, repositioning some of your investments may be a tax-efficient way to leave a larger financial legacy.

  • Planning for end-of-life costs with your legacy in mind

    Senior Estate Planner Mike Repak explains how establishing an end-of-life health care plan can protect the value of your legacy.

  • In retirement - Staying on track & making your income last

    Congratulations—you’ve made it to retirement!

  • Planning for the future with an ABLE account

    If you or a family member has a disability, you may be interested in learning about a new tax-advantaged option called an ABLE account which can be used to save or invest for qualified disability expenses. Many states have already launched ABLE programs, and more are in the works.

  • Charitable giving

    Charitable giving can play an important role in many estate plans. Philanthropy cannot only give you great personal satisfaction, it can also give you a current income tax deduction, let you avoid capital gains tax, and reduce the amount of taxes your estate may owe when you die.

  • Leaving a legacy

    You've worked hard over the years to accumulate wealth, and you probably find it comforting to know that after your death the assets you leave behind will continue to be a source of support for your family, friends, and the causes that are important to you.

  • Key estate planning documents you need

    There are five estate planning documents you may need, regardless of your age, health, or wealth.

  • Asset protection in estate planning

    You're beginning to accumulate substantial wealth, but you worry about protecting it from future potential creditors.

  • Estate planning and income tax basis

    Income tax basis can be an important factor in deciding whether to make gifts during your lifetime or transfer property at your death. This is because the income tax basis for the person receiving the property depends on whether the transfer is by gift or at death.

  • Introduction to estate planning

    Simply stated, estate planning is a method for determining how to distribute your property during your life and at your death. It is the process of developing and implementing a master plan that facilitates the distribution of your property after your death and according to your goals and objectives.

  • Wills: The cornerstone of your estate plan

    If you care about what happens to your money, home, and other property after you die, you need to do some estate planning. There are many tools you can use to achieve your estate planning goals, but a will is probably the most vital.

  • Don’t procrastinate - establish your will

    Establishing a will is certainly not a favorite undertaking for anyone, but it’s important. In fact, it’s one of the most important things to take care of that people commonly forget about, avoid, or procrastinate.

  • Why use life insurance in estate planning

    Conversations about estate-tax planning and life insurance often go hand-in-hand. Why? Because life insurance can be a way to help loved ones pay for estate taxes, as well as to provide estate liquidity. Even when an estate wouldn’t owe any federal estate taxes, life insurance can play a useful role in your overall financial-and-estate plan.

  • Moving forward financially after the loss of a spouse

    The loss of a spouse can be a devastating, life-changing event. Due to longer life expectancies, women are more likely to face this situation.

  • Translating goals into action

    Creating an estate plan may seem like a difficult and complex undertaking. But if you approach the task in steps, you will find you can transform your financial goals into an action plan that will help protect your family’s financial future.

  • A family conversation on estate planning

    Estate planning forces you to accept the inevitability of your own demise, as well as the possibility of your eventual incapacity or disability. Then, as if that weren’t enough of a challenge, you’re often met with a confusing maze of jargon and decisions to make that can leave you frozen in your tracks—with documents unfinished, accounts incorrectly titled, and trusts unfunded.

  • Trust basics

    Their power is in their versatility--many types of trusts exist, each designed for a specific purpose.

  • Estate planning for procrastinators

    Sometimes a serious illness or health scare prompts people to take a hard look at their estate planning. Frequently, this is when the desire to minimize the impact of estate/inheritance taxes becomes a priority.

  • Protecting the value of your business for the next generation

    Financial Planner, Mike Repak, discusses some common issues that can affect a business when an owner dies.

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