• Retirement plans for the self-employed: Choosing the right plan for you

    Saving for retirement is a main concern for most working folks, but as a self-employed individual, there are a number of differences for your retirement planning strategies.

  • Approaching retirement: What you should be doing now

    You’ve worked hard to save toward your retirement goal, and as it gets closer, now is the time to make some important decisions and nail down the specifics.

  • How to start planning retirement withdrawals

    Planning a retirement withdrawal strategy is a fundamental step toward replacing a traditional paycheck with a long-term retirement “paycheck.”

  • The Three A’s of Retirement Income

    You’ve spent your entire working life saving and investing in tax-advantaged retirement accounts like 401(k)s and IRAs.

  • Trusteed IRAs need to be reviewed under post-Secure Act rules

    One common estate planning technique for clients with large retirement plan balances is to designate a trust as the beneficiary of those accounts. However, those planning to use a trust or trusteed Individual Retirement Account (IRA) are encouraged to take a fresh look at their plans following the updated distribution rules of the SECURE Act1.

  • Consider a backdoor Roth if you make too much to contribute to a Roth IRA

    A Roth IRA is an individual retirement account that allows a person to set aside after-tax income up to a specified amount each year. Both earnings on the account and withdrawals after age 59 1/2 are tax free if it has been at least five years since you first opened and contributed to your Roth IRA, regardless of your age when you opened it.

  • Generating tax-efficient retirement income

    You know the importance of saving enough money for retirement so that you have readily available sources of funds to augment your guaranteed income from Social Security and any pensions. But did you also know that how you go about converting your assets into income can have significant tax implications?

  • Why opt for a 'total return' retirement strategy?

    Back in our grandparents’ day, retirement didn’t require a lot of planning. You retired at age 65 and could pretty much count on a solid guaranteed monthly income stream (from the combination of Social Security and a company pension) to cover your essential expenses such as food, shelter, and clothing.

  • 6 tips for retirement literacy

    A recent Federal Reserve survey reported that 26% of non-retirees do not have any self-directed retirement savings.

  • Is your portfolio in sync with your retirement withdrawal strategy?

    A basic approach to withdrawing assets would include liquidating bank accounts, non-qualified brokerage accounts, non-qualified variable annuities, IRA accounts, and Roth IRA accounts, in that order.

  • Tax deferral strategies for employer stock in a qualified retirement plan

    If you participate in a 401(k), or other qualified retirement plan that lets you invest in your employer’s stock, consider the tax deferral opportunities of net unrealized appreciation.

  • Should I convert from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA in a volatile market?

    The lowering of tax rates prior to the coronavirus pandemic made it a good time to consider converting your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.

  • Timing is everything: Using annuities as a retirement planning tool

    Timing when you plan to retire is usually focused on your personal goals and circumstances. Market conditions or the economy often don’t play a part in the equation.

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