• Top year-end investment tips

    Taking a little time out from the holiday chores to make some strategic saving and investing decisions before December 31 can affect not only your long-term ability to meet your financial goals but also the amount of taxes you'll owe next April.

  • Planning for healthcare costs in retirement

    Did you know that health care costs are likely to be your greatest expense during retirement? This makes it especially important to include health care costs in the equation when you consider how much money you need to save for your retirement. Today’s retirees are living much longer in retirement than their parents did—our increased life expectancy is often achieved through medical care. Here are some strategies to help you prepare.

  • The ABCs of 529 plans

    Congress created 529 plans in 1996 in a piece of legislation that had little to do with college — the Small Business Job Protection Act.

  • Evaluating your college savings withdrawal strategy

    Congratulations—your child has been accepted into college! As you prepare for this exciting transition, it is likely that you have been saving for some time, and now you are ready to start withdrawing from your college savings account(s).

  • A topic-focused approach to advice

    A topic-focused approach to planning allows us to provide advice at the time you need it most in order to help plan for major life events and financial decisions, such as saving for education, growing your family, or preparing for retirement.

  • Saving for retirement and a child’s education at the same time

    You want to retire comfortably when the time comes. You also want to help your child go to college. So how do you juggle the two? The truth is, saving for your retirement and your child's education at the same time can be a challenge. But take heart—you may be able to reach both goals if you make some smart choices now.

  • When marriage ends in divorce or separation

    The end of a marriage is also the beginning of a new financial life. Reconsidering your financial arrangements — whether or not your income will be reduced — should be a priority as you adjust to your new circumstances. The major issues demanding attention and resolution include the following.

  • The importance of "What if" planning

    There is a basic rule that applies to personal finance: plan ahead. But “what if” planning can provide security and preparedness when the unexpected occurs.

  • Maintaining your financial records: The importance of being organized

    An important part of managing your personal finances is keeping your financial records organized. Whether it's a utility bill to show proof of residency or a Social Security card for wage reporting purposes, there may be times when you need to locate a financial record or document--and you'll need to locate it relatively quickly.

  • Don’t let a disability disable your business

    What would happen to your company if you were unable to work due to a disability?

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